24 April 2010

Hamams and Harems: The Occidental and Oriental Worlds

The exquisite blog Little Augury has a new banner showing the Portrait de Monsieur Levett et Mademoiselle Glavani Assis Sur un Divan en Costume Turc by Jean-Étienne Liotard. Liotard (1702 -1789) was a Swiss-French painter who often chose occidentals in oriental dress as his subject. In Woman in Turkish Costume in a Hamam instructing her Servant he depicted two Turkish women. The hamam was the Turkish bath, a popular theme in western art along with the harem. Giovanni Antonio Guardi's (1699 - 1760) Harem Scene creates a Venetian idea of a seraglio and its inhabitants. One woman was able to elevate herself from the harem. Roxelana, Hürrem Sultan (1510 - 1558) became the legal wife of Süleyman the Magnificent of the Ottoman Empire. An anonymous artist shows her in a sixteenth century painting. The portrait of Süleyman is attributed to Venetian Tiziano Vecelli (1490-1576) and his workshop.

8 comments:

  1. I absolutely love Liotard-the last painting is wonderful,something new for me to explore. glad you like the header. pgt

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  2. Hi PGT~ Yes, I love Liotard also and think your new header reflects the diversity and beauty of your blog perfectly. Not that i didn't enjoy the eccentricity of the previous one! Kendra

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  3. We have a similar Liotard (the first one) at the Nelson Atkins in Kansas City. It has always been a family favorite. My husband loves the exotic look. I always admire the deft mix of patterns and tell him that I swear I wore outfits like that in the summer of love (1969) right down to the shoes.

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  4. Hi Home before Dark~ I have not seen the Liotard in person but read the Persian Letters thirty years ago and the cover was illustrated with the painting. I've loved the image ever since, especially those shoes. Kendra

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  5. Was there not a good Liotard exhibit a few years back at the Frick? One of my favourite painters, Liotard. Kendra, it's been a while since I commented by I really do like your blog.

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  6. Hi Blue, Always a pleasure to hear from you and read your blog. I didn't catch the exhibit at the Frisk, I wish I had. Kendra

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  7. Love this posting. I am fascinated by colonial American attempts to adopt the exotic. See one of my posts...

    http://b-womeninamericanhistory18.blogspot.com/2009/03/classic-costumes-in-18th-century.html

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  8. Thank you for your comment and making me aware of your excellent post.

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